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Potato time

Recently I’ve been entering different recipe contests in hopes of winning some money for our honeymoon and wedding.  Honestly, it has been a lot of fun and really hasn’t been hard to work these recipes into my normal routine.

For example, earlier this week I made Rosemary Olive bread. Recipe Riot is having a contest on homemade bread so I thought I would give this one a try. The recipe is easy, just slightly time consuming, but the resulting bread is really worth the effort. I used it to make chicken parmesan sandwiches for dinner twice this week. See?  Easy to incorporate!

Well yesterday I was looking around this little old thing called the internet and happened upon a contest using Simply Potatoes. They have a variety of different products, all using real potatoes, butter, etc… making them an ingredient I am more than comfortable with.  You might remember that late last year I introduced you to lefse.  A flatbread made primarily out of mashed potatoes.  When making lefse, you can opt to use either leftover mashed potatoes or a product like Simply Potatoes pre-made mashed potatoes. The Simply Potatoes product actually works better because there are no lumps in their mashed potatoes.  My mashed potatoes are creamy and decadent but are usually more lumpy than not.

Whenever I make a batch of mashed potatoes that is lump free I’ll jump for joy.

Last night I decided to give pierogies and potato tart quiches a try. Ever heard of a pierogie?  This is another one of those “treats” passed down from my Hungarian relatives. Like cabbage rolls and lefse, my mom would make them all the time when I was a child, especially during the holidays. I always turned my nose up at pierogies. They just weren’t my thing. Sauerkraut, cottage cheese, potatoes mixed together? Ya, definitely not my thing.

But, just like cabbage rolls, I started to like pierogies. So not only does my dad have to fight me for cabbage rolls and lefse when I go home, but pierogies are now on the list.  Let it be known that it is not that my mom doesn’t make enough food, my father just has a tremendous appetite.  It’s mind boggling.

The recipe I used last night followed the traditional pierogie recipe that my mom makes. However, the dough filling is quite different and is absolutely not traditional.  Pierogies are very similar to large gnocchi and can be stuffed with just about anything. Next time I think I will try stuffing with a sweet potato basil filling. Doesn’t that sound delicious?

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Simply Potatoes Pierogies
Serves 4

For the pierogie
1 1/2 cup bread flour, plus an additional 1/2 cup to cup for kneading and rolling
1 cup Simply Potatoes mashed potatoes, chilled
1 tsp salt
1 egg yolk (save egg white for sealing the pierogie)

For the filling
1/3 cup crumbled goat cheese
4 green onions, chopped
1/2 cup spinach, chopped
1/2 cup sun dried tomatoes, chopped
1/3 cup low fat sour cream or cottage cheese (pierogie chef’s choice!)
1/2 tsp garlic salt
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp pepper

For boiling
4 cups salted water

For pan frying
2 tbsp butter
1/4 cup onion

In a medium size bowl, combine potatoes, flour, salt, and egg yolk.  Work together until a dough forms.  Flour a countertop with additional flour and begin to knead the dough for about two minutes. You do not want the dough to be too sticky, so add more flour as kneaded (ha, get it?)

Let dough sit while you prepare the filling. In a medium bowl stir together all the ingredient for the filling until combined.

Roll pierogie dough out and cut out small circles about 2 1/2 inches in diameter and 1/6 of an inch thick. I know these measurements sound specific, but don’t worry if it isn’t exact. You just want the dough to be somewhat thin, but not paper thin, and want a wide enough circle so you can stuff the pierogie.

Place slightly less than a tablespoon worth of filling into each dough circle.  Brush the edges of the dough with egg white and fold one side over top of the other and seal. Make sure the seal is tight. Do this until you have used all the filling.

Bring 4 cups of salted water to boil.  Once water is boiling, drop pierogies into the water. They will float to the top when they are ready to be pan fried.  Let them take their time.

In a large skillet melt butter and add onions. Once pierogies are floating transfer them from the water to the skillet. Pan fry about 2 minutes per side.



I let mine get pretty brown, but you can opt to cook them for less time. Again, pierogie maker’s choice!

Once done, remove pierogies from skillet.  Serve with chopped onion and sour cream.

So, like I mentioned, not quite the traditional filling. But delicious nonetheless. Keeping Wes away from these so I would have enough to photograph was a difficult task. Poor guy only got to sample one. I’m pretty sure he liked it. I promised to re-fry them again tonight so he could have them for dinner.

Re-fry… doesn’t that sound healthy?

This was my first creation with Simply Potatoes. I also created a Potato Tart Quiche in muffin tins. Did you know that potatoes made such versatile dough?  Have you ever tried a pierogie? If not, you are missing out!

March 3, 2012 - 12:58 am

Wheres k&b - Pierogies are delicious. Ever since I saw it on cooking mama, I’ve been eating these non-stop !

ratedkb.blogspot.com

March 3, 2012 - 6:30 am

Anonymous - Hey! Great idea, a must do this weekend. But you know that pierogies are from Poland? It is also a polish word.

March 3, 2012 - 7:25 am

Linds - I did actually. This recipe is from my Hungarian relatives though. It is a favorite. Thanks for stopping by!

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